“Goat in the Attic” memoir answers question: What was daily life like in farmland Poland during Nazi occupation?

“Goat in the Attic and Other Stories: A Young Girl’s Memories of Hitler’s Occupation of Poland” a new memoir from Newman Springs Publishing delivers what possibly no other book about World War II has to this degree: a highly personal, first-hand account of a young farm girl’s life in Poland, concluding with her dream of assimilation as a US immigrant.

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New 76-page book details ordinary life in extraordinarily historic times told through the eyes of a young girl.

Author Sophie Stach Virgilio was months old when Hitler invaded Poland in September 1939.  During Hitler’s occupation and the beginning of communism, she lived with her family on a farm in southeast Poland.  At times jarring or joyous, these 26 stories answer the question, “What was daily life like during one of the most volatile times and places in history?” 

“Goat in the Attic” is a collection of stories about ordinary life in extraordinarily historic times told through the eyes of a young girl, including…

  • Living with spontaneous Gestapo farm inspections
  • Providing life-saving help to neighbors and strangers
  • Finding joy during Christmas pageant performances while Nazis stood watch
  • Creating comfort with family and strangers in a seemingly impossible time
  • Identifying ways to protect and give when life is filled with daily “unknowns”
  • Setting out to find the American dream; resiliency, triumph and determination

“Goat in the Attic and Other Stories: A Young Girl’s Memories of Hitler’s Occupation of Poland” (76 pages / $12 paperback / $10 Kindle) by Sophie Stach Virgilio, is available on Amazon, Apple iBooks, and Barnes and Noble, and at bookstores everywhere.

Richard@TheBPlot.com

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